©2018 The Joy of Reading

Berkeley, CA

FAQs

How often should my student work with a tutor?

I recommend at least twice a week for most students. This depends somewhat on how much the student is struggling, and how much practice they get between sessions. 

Why is my child struggling so much in math?

Many students struggle in math because they lack the conceptual understanding that underlies what they are learning. Unfortunately, math is often taught abstractly in school, and so a child may be able to remember the formula, but not actually understand how or why it works. I work with students to develop number sense and deep conceptual understanding, as well as working on facts and procedural fluency, so that they can master their current math content and be more successful in math moving forward. 

How do you teach reading to students with Dyslexia?

There are several important skills involved in being a strong reader. Dyslexic students struggle most with phonological awareness (hearing the sounds in words), decoding, and spelling. I use a research based curriculum grounded in the Orton-Gillingham Method called All About Reading. This program utilizes multi-sensory instruction to make learning tangible. Each lesson has a focus that helps students progress through a sequence of concepts needed for effective reading.

There are several important skills involved in being a strong reader. Dyslexic students struggle most with phonological awareness (hearing the sounds in words), decoding, and spelling. I use a research based curriculum grounded in the Orton-Gillingham Method called All About Reading. This program utilizes multi-sensory instruction to make learning tangible. Each lesson has a focus that helps students progress through a sequence of concepts needed for effective reading.

How do you teach reading to students who don't have Dyslexia but still struggle with reading?

A lot of the same methods that work with students with Dyslexia can benefit all learners. In addition to the all about Reading Curriculum, I also draw from Explode the Code, Handwriting Without Tears, Sight Word Study, and guided reading for fluency, comprehension, decoding, and vocabulary, and am happy to support students with school related assignments. 

What can I do at home to support my child with reading?

Lots!  Read aloud to your child every day. Make sure they can see the pictures and hold the book sometimes. Talk about the story - what you noticed, what you wonder, what you think might happen next, and how it connects to your experience and the world around you. Listen to audiobooks - this builds background knowledge and listening comprehension. Have your child read to you and talk with them about the book. Even beginning readers can use the pictures to retell stories they have heard again and again. Older students can read new books to practice decoding and comprehension, and reread familiar books to practice fluency.